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June 09, 2008

Comments

Canez1

Cal LMAO!!! I don't remember that fight at all???

Gastineau has some long azz gorilla arm's!!LOL

What a puzzy tho. What do you expect from a Jet tho.

GO CANEZ!!!!!

Rubcatcane

Somebody hasn't been reading up! :-P

Posted by: Loco | June 11, 2008 at 11:04 AM

Canes Girl's back with a vengeance! It is all cool Loco, CGINC can triple post if she wanted. Just makes the blog classier when she posts.... :)

CanesgirlNC

Loco, ahhhhh if all I had to do was sell cutlery.......;-D

CanesgirlNC

Rubcatcane - purrrrrrrr to U

Canez1

S Joe Wylie is expected by Mcgriff to play corner.

The #'s are starting to sort themselves out.

Bring in the balla's and let them fall where they may. True canez will do whatever, wherever, whenever for this program.

GO CANEZ!!!!!

Loco

Loco, ahhhhh if all I had to do was sell cutlery.......;-D

Posted by: CanesgirlNC | June 11, 2008 at 11:41 AM

don't blame me because you have a REAL job :-P

Cane Since 1982

Selling knifes is not a real job?

Suffering Miami Fan

To the tune of Beauty and the Beast's "Gaston". Dedicated to their fan-hating, media-dodging, last-to-shake-hands-in-a-loss overconfident player that shushed the fans in Game One, then disappeared in Game Three, going 0-5 with 5 men LOB.

Gosh it was fun to shush you, Gaston
Now you're so down in the dumps
The press wanted to interview you, Gaston
But you wouldn't take your lumps
There's no clown in town as laughed at as you
You're every Cane fans' favorite guy
Everyone's awed and inspired by you
And it's not very hard to see why

No one's hushed like Gaston
Team got trussed like Gaston
No one's head as incredibly thick as Gaston's
For there's no man in town half as silly
Perfect, a pure foolish clown!
You can ask any Tom, Dick or Shandel
And they'll say whose team they just saw the Canes sat on

No one chokes like Gaston
Shushes folks like Gaston
No one's got the wrong finger on his lips like Gaston
He's known for his Premature "Celebrating"!
My what a guy, that Gaston!

Give five "hushes"
Give twelve "boo-hoos"
Gaston is the best
At giving his team a chance to lose

No one taunts like Gaston
Likes to flaunt like Gaston
In baseball game nobody pops up like Gaston!
For there's no one as overconfident
As you see he's got taunting to spare
Not a bit of him's going to the World Series
That's right!
And every last one of the Canes will be there

No one hides like Gaston
Picks the wrong side like Gaston
In a tiebreaker goes oh for five like Gaston
His girl says he's early with everything!
Ten seconds for Gaston!

When he was a lad he worked in a library
Every morning to learn that shush move
And now that he's grown he thinks it's primary
Shushing in Games one forgetting the other two
Oh, ahhh, wow!
My what a clown, Gaston!

Makes you laugh, that Gaston
Cut down by half, that Gaston
Then doesn't apologize to the fans like Gaston
Then after game three he goes disappearing!
My what a clown, Gaston!


CVS

I found a great article about Miami and the Jan 1 1984 Orange Bowl!!!

On the morning before he sent his sacrificial lambs out to slaughter the butcher, University of Miami coach Howard Schnellenberger gazed out a picture window in his hotel suite high above downtown Miami and wondered aloud if the Nebraska Cornhuskers realized "what a bunch of alley cats they're about to run into." He said he doubted it. He said he doubted a number of things about No. 1-ranked, 12-0 Nebraska, including whether it was as unbeatable as everybody thought. The bookies, for example, had made the Huskers an 11-point favorite. Looking lordly in his Oriental smoking jacket and red felt slippers, Schnellenberger bit down on a bagel and wondered, too, if the Huskers realized they were about to get hit from the heavens by a round-eyed, curly-haired freshman quarterback who talks as if he's 30, thinks as if he's 40 and may not be spacy but is definitely from another world. "I doubt it," said Schnellenberger.
What he didn't doubt was his Hurricanes. "The only thing that worries me," he said, "is that they're so high I have to walk among them like a zombie so they won't get any higher. I mean they are high." He pointed out that the Hurricanes were "about to face the Russian Army, and they don't care. They think they're going to win. And I'm the silly bastard who has everybody around here thinking they will." Schnellenberger smiled. "That's O.K. I think so, too."
It's unlikely that any team in the history of college football ever got higher for a game than Miami did for Nebraska, and if you missed Monday night's Orange Bowl, you missed an emergence. Before a crowd bleating with passion, the hometown Hurricanes dealt themselves the national championship by pulling it from the hands and from under the nose of a Husker team to which many honored observers, including those with names like Parseghian, Paterno and Devaney, had already conceded supernal status. In the end, the bitten-fingernail-thin margin of a batted-away two-point conversion attempt with less than a minute to play was the difference in Miami's 31-30 victory. The win, combined with Georgia's 10-9 Cotton Bowl defeat of previously unbeaten Texas, locked up the No. 1 spot for the Hurricanes.
When the two-point pass failed, the 72,549 Orange Bowl fans—a lot of them, anyway—poured onto the field like a wave of green and orange lemmings even before the game was finally and mercifully over, mercifully because the crowd couldn't have taken much more. Down went Nebraska's 22-game winning streak, and up went the burgee of a team that may well be the next great name in the game. For this is no flashdance Schnellenberger has choreographed in Miami; it's a precision chorus line of young, tough, talented and cocky-loud high-steppers, and they look and act as if they might be around for a while.
What made the upset all the more stunning is that Miami was rebuilt from slag by Schnellenberger in five short years. When he took the Hurricane job in 1979, the university wasn't even sure it wanted a football team and had a pretty good idea it couldn't afford it. But now it's stuck with the best. Said Schnellenberger as the sweat dripped from his mustache in the Miami locker room, "No words can describe it."
Well, some words can and should. "Bernie Kosar" are a couple that will do for starters. Kosar has what Hurricane quarterback coach Marc Trestman calls "the gift." It almost need not be said that the gift includes the ability to pass—all good quarterbacks can do that. What distinguishes this gawky-looking post-adolescent is a mind Trestman calls "razor-sharp" and the uncanny ability, says Schnellenberger, "to find the right receiver 18 out of 20 times." Completion records are often deceiving. A quarterback who connects on 10 of 12 passes might have thrown half of those to the wrong man and thus gotten only half the yards he could have. Kosar, says Trestman, "picks up the subtleties" and is so icy cool under fire that he not only amazes his coaches but astounds his fellow players as well. "They tell me they'd protect me with their lives," Kosar says. And they do.
In the final hours before the Orange Bowl, Trestman said he knew Kosar was ready for Nebraska because "he was going around like he was bopping, loose and relaxed. But I could see the wheels turning. We run a very sophisticated offense, and he makes it go. Inside, his mind was going wild."
Against the would-be champions, Kosar did indeed go wild. Schnellenberger said if Kosar had any kind of day at all, the Cornhuskers were in for it "because in their conference [the Big Eight] they haven't seen a drop-back passer all season to compare with Bernie." The first time Miami got the ball, Kosar announced the kind of day he was going to have: three completions in three attempts on a 57-yard touchdown drive, climaxed by a two-yard toss in the right flat to tight end Glenn Dennison. Another Hurricane march ended in a field goal, and before the first quarter was over, Kosar found Dennison again, this time over the middle on a 22-yard pass play that put Miami ahead 17-0. In all, Kosar completed 19 of 35 passes for 300 yards. No quarterback had had a better day this season against the Huskers, but more crucial was this: Kosar's passing canceled the Nebraska ground attack, which had accounted for 401.7 yards a game. Against the smallish Miami defense, which gave up 36 pounds per man on the line of scrimmage, Nebraska runners had to settle for 287.
To offset the Huskers' tonnage, the Hurricanes chose to forgo the reckless chances—safety blitzes and the like—other teams had taken against Nebraska. Instead, Miami combined its natural tenacity with a bewildering number of looks, which defensive coordinator Tom Olivadotti had devised in hopes of getting the Corn-huskers into a "second-and-15 situation" at least once every time they had the ball. Certainly the Hurricanes weren't wholly successful, but Olivadotti's tactics worked frequently enough. Before the game Schnellenberger had said, "Weight only works against you if it's leaning on you. If it's not, if it has to stop to figure out where to lean, it's not a factor."
Looking at the films the Miami coaches had picked up a vital key: Nebraska center Mark Traynowicz snapped the ball on his own count—that is, whenever he was ready. The Miami linemen, like the Husker blockers, keyed off Traynowicz, which gave the Hurricanes a crucial split second they wouldn't have had if Nebraska had gone on a snap count determined in the huddle. Further, the Hurricane front five and linebackers seemed to strike from every possible angle, which saved them the wear and tear of straight-on confrontations with the Huskers' beefy line. Finally, the Miami linemen got a stunning variety of support from the secondary. "I'd give my left ear if I could get them to pass," Schnellenberger had said, and he tempted the Huskers by sending his irrepressible cornerbacks, Rodney Bellinger and Reggie Sutton, flying up to meet the dreaded Nebraska option plays. As often as not, Bellinger and Sutton were playing like linebackers, and as a result, every Husker TD drive, save the last, consumed at least 10 plays. In other words, Miami denied Nebraska the big play.
The Hurricanes had Nebraska's 52-points-a-game offense misfiring for a quarter and a half. They didn't give up a score until Husker coach Tom Osborne dusted off an old hidden-ball play that had 270-pound guard Dean Steinkuhler pick up a deliberate fumble by quarterback Turner Gill and, running against the direction of the play, pound 19 yards to a touchdown. For the remainder of the half Miami went overly pass-happy, and the Cornhuskers effectively mixed up their coverages and, for the time being, shut down Kosar. Meanwhile, I-back Mike Rozier, the Heisman winner, broke loose on a couple of options, and Nebraska pulled even. A Gill sneak late in the second quarter and a 34-yard field goal after a fumble recovery a minute-plus into the second half made the score 17-17.
At this point, it seemed that Miami's jig was up and the inevitable rout on—were it not for two things Schnellenberger had emphasized in his pregame analysis: 1) that the Hurricanes could move on Nebraska whenever they got their pass-run act in proper balance and 2) that as long as Miami kept the score close, the Huskers would have to play their starters. "With the season they had, blowing everybody out, their regulars aren't used to playing so much," he'd said. "If it's hot, they'll wear out. Their size will work against them."
The weather wasn't hot (66° at kick-off), but Miami was on two well-designed third-quarter drives. The first covered 75 yards in 10 plays. It was made up of three Kosar completions—the first to his best receiver, Eddie Brown, who wound up with a game-high six catches—and an assortment of traps and counters that featured freshman fullback Alonzo Highsmith. Highsmith scored on a one-yard dive to put Miami ahead for good.
Miami drove to another touchdown and took a 31-17 lead into the fourth quarter. If a rout was on, the wrong team was doing the routing. Miami was getting superior blocking from its "rejects and retreads," as Schnellenberger calls his linemen, and, equally important, from fullbacks Highsmith and Albert Bentley. The Cornhuskers realized from the start that given time Kosar would pick them apart, so early in the second quarter they started sending their safeties and corner-backs crashing in—as often as not to be met by crushing blocks from Bentley or Highsmith. Kosar seldom was pressured and never was sacked.
Schnellenberger doesn't worry about falling behind because, he says, "our entire offense is a two-minute drill." The ploys used to offset Nebraska's size and rush included quick screens and sprint draws. Indeed, the Hurricanes were much more successful on the ground than expected. On the night, Highsmith gained 50 yards on just seven carries, Bentley picked up 46 on 10, and Keith Griffin added 41 on nine.
If Schnellenberger's forecast regarding the Nebraska regulars was correct, the Hurricanes were in the clubhouse with their 14-point lead with less than 12 minutes remaining. But Nebraska had saved something for the last hole. With Jeff Smith spelling Rozier, who had left the game with a twisted left ankle in the third quarter after having gained 147 yards on 25 carries, the Cornhuskers marched 76 yards—the last yard coming on a Smith plunge—to make the score 31-24. Then, after a Miami field-goal attempt went wide, Nebraska got the ball back with 1:47 to play.
One-forty-seven was an extravagance. Gill needed only 59 seconds to take the Huskers 74 yards, but he nearly ran out of downs. On fourth-and-eight from the Miami 24-yard line Smith took a Gill pitch, swept right and dived into the end zone. Suddenly it was 31-30: a point to tie and still gain the national title, two to win. "I knew they'd go for two," said Hurricane roverback Kenny Calhoun. "They're champions. They had to."
Schnellenberger was so sure of it he ordered up a two-point defense even before he observed which conversion unit Nebraska had on the field. Gill rolled right, and Calhoun's man, wingback Irving Fryar, released to the inside. "When I saw that, I went out to pick him [Smith] up," said Calhoun. "He [Gill] threw a little behind [Smith], and I got three fingers of my left hand on the ball." The pass fluttered away, and with it Nebraska's No. 1 ranking. "I do that kind of thing all the time," Calhoun said, and winked.
The victory, the Hurricanes' 11th in a row, gave Miami the longest winning streak in major-college football. This was also the Hurricanes' first appearance in the Orange Bowl in 33 years, and it's worth noting that they, with the freewheeling Schnellenberger conducting, treated themselves to every pregame entertainment available. "Join the Hurricanes and see Miami," said middle guard Tony Fitzpatrick. The Cornhuskers, meanwhile, kept their noses to the grindstone and their practices off limits—Miami even invited Nebraska reporters to its workouts. On press day Schnellenberger arrived in a helicopter. Osborne came in a Volkswagen bus.
A few nights later, at a private dinner during which the shrapnel from the stone crabs was flying and the football conversation more or less centered on the way the Hurricanes were conducting themselves—enjoyably, for the most part—Osborne asked a friend if Schnellenberger "always did things like that." No, he was told, "but he looks like he would like to get used to it."

- CVS

CVS

Bernie Kosar, Miami's unfreshmanlike freshman quarterback, characterizes the Hurricane offense as "disciplined." He figures it has to be to execute all the gymnastics and high-wire acts that Coach Howard Schnellenberger demands of it. On the other hand, Miami Middle Guard Tony Fitzpatrick, the stubby block of muscle and mouth who's what you might expect to get if you crossed the understander on an Irish tumbling team with a Tazmanian devil, characterizes the Hurricane defense as "loose" and, well, loud. It rags and jaws and talks trash, and pops opposing players with such percussion the Gatorade trembles in the cups along the sidelines. It harasses, it intimidates, it dominates. In other words, says a rival coach who doesn't have to play Miami this year, "It's a joy to watch."
The Hurricanes are the most amazing college football team of 1983, and the amazing Kosar, with his wonderful right arm and his 3.4 GPA—he passes and passes—is as responsible as any individual for that. Kosar keeps outgunning the big guns, as he did in Saturday's shootout with West Virginia's Jeff Hostetler, and Miami's offense keeps rolling ever closer to an Orange Bowl date with Nebraska.
It's the Hurricane defensive unit, however, that's really amazing. Granted the peculiarities of polls, bowl committees and conference tie-ups—not to mention the four hairy weekends left in the season—the Miami defense may be the only one left with a chance to spike No. 1 Nebraska and its prepotent attack. The prerequisites for such an appetizing matchup, of course, are that the Cornhuskers win the Big Eight title and that Miami beat East Carolina and Florida State in its last two games. The Orange Bowl committee has its breath held.
In their mad dash up the rankings, the Hurricanes have won eight consecutive games since opening with a 28-3 loss at Florida. Last week before a howling crowd of 63,881 at the Orange Bowl, Miami brushed aside 11th-ranked West Virginia 20-3 just about as easily as the irrepressible Fitzpatrick says he handles opposing centers: "I flip 'em around like a dishrag." The first 10 times the Mountaineers ran the ball, they netted a grand total of zero yards. Counting six sacks, West Virginia backs wound up with a net two yards on the ground, and Hostetler, who had been averaging 200 yards passing, was held to 166 in 29 attempts. He was benched in the fourth quarter when Coach Don Nehlen decided that "he might get killed out there."
Not to worry too much, Coach. For all the flaring nostrils and airy emissions, Miami's defense is as disciplined as its offense—"like a Rolex watch," says Fitzpatrick. It was as much technique as terror that stopped Hostetler. The Hurricane defense, which ranks second in the nation in fewest yards allowed (241 per game), is tutored by a civilized and quiet man named Tom Olivadotti—Commander O to the troops—who contrives so many deceptive alignments and coverages that beaten rivals frequently can't tell what Miami did, even after seeing the films. Commander O's troops include a few bona fide talents and a bunch of guys who make up for not being great by playing great. Linebacker Jay Brophy, for example, is an All-America candidate who studies films and picks up things. Last week he detected that Hostetler has a tendency to keep both hands on the ball when he's going to drop back to pass, but only one when he's going to hand off. That's the sort of info an active linebacker can make hay with. Brophy had a hand in a game-high 15 tackles.
And, of course, there's Fitzpatrick, who passed up a chance to go to Liberty Baptist in Lynchburg, Va., the only school other than Miami to offer him a scholarship. Until he tore a tendon in his left biceps late in the game, an injury that requires surgery and will knock him out for the year, Fitzpatrick was having the season of a lifetime. Early against the Mountaineers he put Hostetler down with emphasis, and as the two of them got up he says the quarterback asked him,
"What's your first name, Fitzpatrick?"
"Tom."
"I got a feeling I'm gonna see a lot more of you today."
"You can count on it."
After the Mountaineers capped a game-opening 75-yard drive with a short field goal, the Hurricanes retaliated with an icy-cool 81-yard scoring march. In it the remarkably poised Kosar—his concentration is so good that he says he often doesn't realize he has been knocked down on a pass rush until he finds himself getting back up—completed five passes. Four were to Tight End Glenn Dennison, who has hands like tar buckets and sets a school receiving record every time he catches the ball. His last grab on the drive was for 19 yards and the go-ahead-for-good TD.
Miami went up 10-3 in the second quarter on a 36-yard field goal by Jeff Davis and then opened the third quarter with another long drive that led to a Davis kick from 31 yards. The Hurricanes clinched the game with a 90-yard scoring drive that was climaxed by a five-yard pass from Kosar to Running Back Keith Griffin with 13:13 to play. The big number was a 49-yard pass to Wide Receiver Eddie Brown. Kosar reads blitzes and coverages as if they were primers, and against the Mountaineers he completed 19 of 36 throws for 211 yards and had four or five perfect passes dropped.
The Hurricanes have won 23 of 25 games at home under Schnellenberger, who plucked the Miami program out of the ashes five years ago. After Saturday's game, Schnellenberger, who's apparently into analogies these days, told his team, "It's a horse race now, with other horses ahead but struggling and the finish line in sight." He likened the Hurricanes' circumstances to "being two pitches away from victory in the ninth inning." They believe him.
Who knows? Maybe Nebraska will, too, come Jan. 2.

- CVS

Canez1

Loco don't listen to her!! Put off working full time as long as you can bro. You have your whole life to work. Have fun and do what you want for now.

TOEPICK!!!! ;)

GO CANEZ!!!!!

Cat5 Cane


Ocala... great shots!

Soup...
Do U have the picture of Max and myself.

CVS

This quote makes me smile!!!!
86, Cav, my other peeps...tell me what you think about this describing Notre Dame fans as written by sports illustrated back in 1988 when miami tied the game at 21 apiece:
"the general feeling of the stunned Golden Dome fans was Heaven help us, Miami is possessed by the devil."
- CVS

Loco

Loco don't listen to her!! Put off working full time as long as you can bro. You have your whole life to work. Have fun and do what you want for now.

TOEPICK!!!! ;)

GO CANEZ!!!!!

Posted by: Canez1 | June 11, 2008 at 12:08 PM


Lol thanks, i know. I'd like to put it off as long as I can

Manny Navarro

He's right. I do have to lay off the milkshakes. But at least I'm not ashamed of who I am. I'm representing for all the fat guys in the world!

Seriously, it doesn't bother me a bit. But thanks for getting my back BG and Loco. Those milkshakes are off the chain.

Loco

Good to see you around here Manny. You wouldn't happen to know who covers baseball recruiting would you?

RCCF

Whtz goin on CANES...Just wanted 2 know if anyone knows where Jarrett Payton is hiding and is he a canidate to take Cedric Benson spot in Chicago???

Cavaleer

CGNC, thanks darlin'. ;)

RayChan, I don't think Jarret's in Chi-town, maybe not even in the League. Don't quote me though.

TimCanes, Eugene Smith wants to go where he'll be able to play. We have 3 freshmen QBs who are all ballers. He'd be on the pine for a long time even if he RSs. He'll probably wind up at UF.

Berry might get an offer with Luqman's transfer but don't bet on it. We have Bryce and Miller most likely coming in. But our most important needs are OL, DL and CB this year. At the same time, Shannon wants to stockpile talent if he can, so you never know. It will be interesting.

But seriously, as Calvin said, you don't have to worry about recruiting with Team Shannon in charge.

SOUP

Do U have the picture of Max and myself.

Posted by: Cat5 Cane | June 11, 2008 at 12:16 PM

I do, on my camera, haven't downloaded yet, will do and forward later...running as fast as I can!

Was in Fort Pierce yesterday, now checked in at Fort Liquordale, headed to the 305 later this PM to meet with the legendary #36, LT if all goes well. Wish me luck!

Old Skool

Jarret Update
This is what I've heard. Wikipedia backs it up:

Payton currently plays the running back position as a member of the Canadian Football League Montreal Alouettes.

SOUP

Those milkshakes are off the chain.

Posted by: Manny Navarro | June 11, 2008 at 12:24 PM

Manny...U are a pretty cool dude and "off the chain" yourself! Thanks for dropping by The Space. BTW, I got your ??? for LT, let's see what he says.

SOUP

Get your Canes gear here:

http://www.hurricanesonlinestore.com/main_objgroup.cfm?nCategoryID=12&nObjGroupID=243&sAuxTitle=Baseball%2008%20&rs=teamsite&rc=baseball

Rubcatcane

Rubcatcane - purrrrrrrr to U

Posted by: CanesgirlNC | June 11, 2008 at 11:41 AM

Gulp... err thanks CGINC. Made my day!

2 cents on Berry, get Him!!! He can return punts or something. Injuries wiped us out last season. OT and Corners we gotta get more of....

Go Canes!!!!

RayChanCanesFan

Are we taking on a jersey change again this season or are we using that same ugly boring plain piping???

Cavaleer

Soup, rock on! My only question for him is how long will it take for these WRs to pound the ground after EVERY dropped ball, the way he, Spencer, Copeland and KW did?

RayChan, I hope to god we have the '01 unis at least. I'm sure Shannon wants to bury all traces of last year, uni's included.

Old Skool, that sounds about right for Payton. I'm sure he's having a ball in Montreal.

CanesgirlNC

Canez1! - "don't listen to her"???? What????? LOL!! ;-)

TOEPICK!!!

Canez1

CG you know you are my fav!!! ;)

GO CANEZ!!!!!

NavyCane4Life

I recieved my Autographed Mo Sikes picture! It's awesome, Thanks CGNC and 86

slim32

cAV - KW = kEVIN wILLIAMS

bEST um RETURNER EVEr

dEVIN WHO?

CanesgirlNC

Hey Minn glad U liked it - and U are welcome.

dj moonbat

I think there's gotta be a REASON they haven't offered Jaamal Berry yet. They offered some other local RB, who's good, but not sick like Berry.

Canez1

DJ Lamar miller is in the bag with BBrown. We don't need another RB this year.

GO CANEZ!!!!!

CanesgirlNC

Canez1 U beat me to the punch but I got the vid to go with it!

TOEPICK!

RB Miami Killian's Lamar Miller

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JgQs4dw1NX8

timcanes

i agree that we are stockpiling...and thank you can and calvin for helping me out...but its just seems to me like injuries have killed us lately! and like i said i dont think its a huge problem is we ended up with berry brown and miller...it seems as tho mcneal and chambers will never live up to much(imo) and we had to move a db to rb this yr already...idk seems like miami should be getting alot more top end prospects...but its just begun so we shall see...
go canes

SuperCooper

New recruiting site run by Larry Bluestein and company. Recruiting news for free. Sure Manny knows about it:

http://www.elitescoutingservices.com/messageboard/forumdisplay.php?s=&daysprune=&f=2

I'm "TheProblem" :)

OCALACANE

Sup Legion?

86...
Lizard Land in the house!!!
Still can't talk very well! I think I did permanent damage to my voice at the Games.
LMAO!!!
New Camera, next outing will be better with more fan pics. Got the battery thing under control now. I have the capacity for 2200 7.1 megapixel shots if my battery consumption stays in check :-)
Cat5 all pics are on myspace at

http://www.myspace.com/ocalacane

Goto pics and they are there. 181 to see!!!

There are also lots of great canes pics there to.

SuperCooper

I think there's gotta be a REASON they haven't offered Jaamal Berry yet. They offered some other local RB, who's good, but not sick like Berry.

Posted by: dj moonbat | June 11, 2008 at 04:02 PM

His grades are awful from what I have read. Like, really bad. There is a reason that OSU is out in front.

SuperCooper

TimCanes, Eugene Smith wants to go where he'll be able to play. . He'll probably wind up at UF.


Posted by: Cavaleer | June 11, 2008 at 01:10 PM

Nope, they are stockpiled at QB too. Here is what he said todau:

Miramar's Eugene Smith, South Florida's top quarterback prospect, said he is considering five schools -- FSU, USF, LSU, Louisville and Michigan. UM, deep in young QBs, hasn't offered, and though the Gators offered, ``They've recruited other quarterbacks, and I don't want to be set back.''

SuperCooper

This one is for Cav

Andre DeBose says Miami is recruiting him the hardest

timcanes

i agree we dont rlly need qbs iwas just confused on why we got highsmith over some1 like smith but now i was told he will prob play different position

timcanes

coop where u finding this info?

dj moonbat

"His grades are awful from what I have read. Like, really bad. There is a reason that OSU is out in front."

I think I saw a recruiting recap by Manny that said he was currently running a 2.2, which won't cut it, I'd guess.

timcanes

dj where do u go for info besides itu and rivals

SuperCooper

"His grades are awful from what I have read. Like, really bad. There is a reason that OSU is out in front."

I think I saw a recruiting recap by Manny that said he was currently running a 2.2, which won't cut it, I'd guess.

Posted by: dj moonbat | June 11, 2008 at 04:26 PM

Has to get it up to a 2.5. Miller is real close and might be there already.

SuperCooper

coop where u finding this info?

Posted by: timcanes | June 11, 2008 at 04:26 PM

Canestime

dj moonbat

"dj where do u go for info besides itu and rivals"

I just go here and to the Herald. I'm a cheap bastid, and just can't justify paying for recruiting info.

timcanes

yeaa i dont pay either thats why i was curious if u knewo f anything else

JC

Berry probably has a lower GPA bc he goes to Palmetto. Good school, tough academics. I should know, I went there.

One year I was there, Palmetto had a sick running back named Corey Kinsey that was in the race for most yards in the county with another RB tho the Canes recruited. That RB was none other than Coral Gables' Frank Gore. I remember going to the Palmetto Gables game where they faced off. Gore looked great. I was stoked when he signed with the Canes.

Tho the difference is Kinsey wasn't considered a D-I prospect and Berry is. Still, just bc the Canes don't go after every hot shot in Miami doesn't mean they're picking the wrong ones. If Miller turns out like Gore, I'm set.

That being said, I hope he has a great year on a terrible team. Killian scks.

timcanes

gores great now but he wasnt amazin at um because he got hurt!! so there ya go they should get both miller and berry cuz if miller(gore) gets hurt than you have berry

SOUP

So here we are at The Titanic again and guess who shows up? Cat5!

And, oh yeah, #36 LAMAR THOMAS!

Shhhhh...keep the noise down I'm working over here!

:::Interview In Progress:::

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